Digital Sisterhood Network Founder Ananda Leeke is talking about social media leadership at #BlogHer13 on July 26 & July 27


Photo Credit: BlogHer.com

Photo Credit: BlogHer.com

Digital Sisterhood Network founder Ananda Leeke is talking about social media leadership at the BlogHer conference on July 26 and July 27 in Chicago. Just in case you miss her talk on “What Type of Social Media Leader Are You?”, we have included her handout and the key takeaways from her talk below. Enjoy!

Ananda Leeke - Photo Credit: Leigh Mosley, www.leighmosley.com

Ananda Leeke – Photo Credit: Leigh Mosley, http://www.leighmosley.com

BlogHer 2013 Session Handout – What Type of Social Media Leader Are You? by Ananda Leeke – www.anandaleeke.com

 

9 Key Takeaways

1)  Michael McKinney’s Leading Blog. McKinney writes, “Leaders are ordinary people that understand that they make a difference and have made the decision to determine the kind of difference they will make. Leadership is intentional influence.” www.leadershipnow.com/leadingblog

2) You are social media leader because you have two things: Digital Power and a Digital Platform of Influence. Digital Power consists of your digital footprint (blog, online business, web site, and social media), communities, and efforts. A Digital Platform of Influence is derived from the impact you have on your blog readers and social media followers and friends when you advocate causes. build communities; create mobile applications, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; curate content; educate and inform; give voice to your thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; share information and experiences; explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; participate in social good campaigns; inspire and motivate; mentor; network; tell your personal stories; and promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others.

3)  As you engage in these activities, your blog readers and social media followers and friends are watching what you say and do online. They are learning from your example. Whether you know it or not, you are leading them.

4) You have the power to decide what type of social media leader you will be. I am here to share what I have been watching ordinary people like you and me do as they lead in the digital space.

5)  The Digital Sisterhood Leadership Project has identified 12 key leadership roles that women in social media are currently playing. They include the roles of:

  • Advocate
  • Community builder
  • Content creator
  • Content curator
  • Educator
  • Influencer
  • Mentor
  • Motivator
  • Promoter
  • Social do gooder
  • Storyteller
  • Thought leader

6) You can use the seven Digital Sisterhood Leadership Archetypes to identify, understand, and manage the leadership roles you play in blogging and social media. Archetypes are various personalities that live inside of us. You can use them as windows of self-discovery. They can help you explore, embrace, and accept yourself. Treat them as team players who help you express your strengths and share your gifts. The seven Digital Sisterhood Leadership Archetypes include:

  •  Creativista is a woman who gives birth to creativity (art, books, films, products, services, and webisodes).
  • Empirista is a woman who thinks of herself as CEO of her own corporation, ME, Inc.; maintains an entrepreneurial mindset; and gives birth to ideas and transforms them into businesses, economies, institutions, networks, and organizations that add value to people’s lives.
  • Empowerista is a woman who creates and curates content, shares information and experiences, connects with others and establishes positive relationships, and builds and participates in communities that empower her and others.
  • Enchantista is a woman who taps into the magic of her spirit as she focuses her energy, opens her heart, trusts her intuition, embraces her fears, and shares her gifts in service to others.
  • Evangelista is a woman who supports and advocates a philosophy, a values system, a lifestyle, a cause, or a campaign that improves her life and others’ lives.
  • Flowista is a woman who unplugs from her digital life and tech devices for periods of time so she can recharge and take care of herself; and encourages women to unplug from their digital lives by incorporating mindfulness and self-care practices
  • Lifestylista is a woman who lives her life as a work of art; expresses it through her passion for beauty, entertaining, fashion, food, home décor, personal style, and travel; and inspires others to live their lives as works of art.

7) While you are here at BlogHer, you are surrounded by a cadre of amazing social media leaders. Some are speakers, sponsors, fellow attendees, party hosts, PR and marketing professionals, volunteers, and BlogHer staff. Keep your eyes open for people who represent your social media leadership style. Find out who they are. If you can, have a brief conversation with them. Make a point of following up with them when you get home. That follow up could be connecting with them via their blog or social media accounts. You can learn a lot by reading about someone and watching what they do. You can also send an email to the person just to keep in touch. If you are not able to reach out to the person at this conference, find the person online. Google them and start watching what they say and do online for information and inspiration. Now everyone that you may identify as a virtual leadership mentor may not be able to connect with you one-on-one.

8) Resources: Digital Sisterhood Leadership Project Pinterest board http://pinterest.com/anandaleeke/blogher13-social-media-leadership-bh13smleader

9) Homework Assignment: Write a six-word about your social media leadership style. Six-word memoirs are six words you use to describe yourself, a state of being or an experience. Tweet Ananda @anandaleeke your six-word memoirs using the hashtag #BH13SMLeader.

#DigitalSisterhood Wednesday at Social Media Week DC 2013’s PRSA NCC Breakfast


smweekdc2013

Happy #DigitalSisterhood Wednesday!

Guess what’s happening this week? Social Media Week! That means lots of opportunities for me to connect with and learn from digital sisters and brothers in Washington, D.C.

Are you attending or following Social Media Week events in your city or another city?

What have been your favorite events so far?

Denise Graveline and Anthony Shop

Denise Graveline and Anthony Shop

PRSA NCC Social Media Week DC 2013 Event

PRSA NCC Social Media Week DC 2013 Event

This morning, I attended a great Social Media Week DC panel discussion on 2013 social media communications trends for communicators featuring Denise Graveline, founder of Don’t Get Caught, and Anthony Shop, managing director of Social Driver. It was sponsored by the Public Relations Society of America’s National Capital Chapter.

Denise Graveline

Denise Graveline

My biggest takeaways were three of the trends Graveline discussed in her presentation: Visual, Mobile, and Integrated. They are now my “VMI” communications strategy for the Digital Sisterhood Network. Click here to read Graveline’s fantastic blog post about her trends.

Digital Sisterhood Network founder Ananda Leeke at PRSA NCC Social Media Week DC 2013 event

Digital Sisterhood Network founder Ananda Leeke at PRSA NCC Social Media Week DC 2013 event

Here are some of my notes from the presentation.

1) Visual

Graveline stated that visual content is the strongest trend in social media that will increase in 2013. So that means it is time to return to my 2011 passion for videos. Here I come YouTube, Animoto, Vimeo, Vine, Facebook video chats, UStream livestreaming, and Google Hangout! It’s time my brother Matt give me editing lessons too.

My love affair for “all things photo” will continue to play itself out on Flickr, Instagram, and Pinterest.

2) Mobile

Graveline shared some interesting statistics about mobile technology users. According to the Harvard Business Review, 46 percent of mobile phone users like you and me use their smartphones for “ME” time. Yes I said “ME” time — pure relaxation, fun, and entertainment. I totally agreed. She talked about how mobile devices give more people access to the web. She also stressed the importance of making sure blogs and web sites are optimized for mobile devices.

3) Integrated

Graveline stressed the value of having one online site as a “base camp” (I like this phrase) for your messages and content. Social media platforms should be used to amplify the messages and content.

She talked about how some folks create a roadblock in their communication efforts by thinking of social media as something you have to add to your long list of things to do rather than as a tool that  enhances your communications efforts. She suggested these folks transform their attitude and accept that social media is how they do business. In short, EMBRACE IT. It’s not going anywhere. It’s here to stay.

She recommended using blog posts instead of press releases or major announcements to achieve better search engine results and connections with reporters.

PS: If you like what you read on Graveline’s blog, click here to subscribe to it. I did. I am also following her on Twitter and Pinterest. She is my new favorite Digital Sisterhood Leader! She rocks!

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Christy Little Jones


Photo Credit: Christy Little Jones

Photo Credit: Christy Little Jones

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Christy Little Jones, M.S., is the Head Coach of My Relationship Revolution, a coaching and resource center that inspires more intentional interactions within the key relationships that impact your life. Christy is featured in the March issue of Real Simple magazine. Her story about forgiving her husband is AMAZING. Be sure to pick up a copy of the magazine and read it! She and her husband will be chatting about relationships at the “What’s Love Got To Do WIth It!” event on Sunday, February 17 from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. at Busboys and Poets in Shirlington, Virginia. Click here to register for the event.

 

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Digital Sisterhood Leadership Project (#DSLead) Interview

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

I launched my business in November 2011 and used social media to build a following and connect with my tribe.

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

It has given me the platform to inspire action and influence change in the lives of men and women around the world. Essentially, it’s helping me to make a difference in the world.

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.”  Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings.  They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

Social media has helped me to share my strengths and experience to women who need it most. In particular, relationships. The most important relationships that we hold as women – in marriage, friendships and as mothers.

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online.  In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: A Memoir of Fierce Living Online (2013), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others.  Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

Supporter, accountability partner, coach, and encourager

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

I help remind women of their God-given strength, power and influence. I am the leader who affirms, supports and lovingly pushes women to step into their magnificence with confidence and authenticity. I am a coach and a cheerleader, helping women to become fearless!

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

It’s mandatory to be authentic as you build your tribe as well as consistent.  Your followers need to be able to trust you.

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

I would like to expand my leadership role by bringing awareness to digital space about my global platform – Child Sex Trafficking. Together we can bring about change, but not without knowledge and commitment to the cause first.

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

Some of my favorite social media women leaders include Ananda Leeke and Fabienne Frederickson. Ananda encourages and include other women entrepreneurs in her success. She also creates a sisterhood among women. I love Fabienne’s strength, passion, and commitment to making your business thrive.

10) Share three ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

Women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand through video, developing relationships via Facebook and Twitter, and publishing an e-zine or newsletter.

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Kathryn Buford


Photo Credit: Kathryn Buford

Photo Credit: Kathryn Buford

Photo Credit: LiveUnchained.com

Photo Credit: LiveUnchained.com

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Kathryn Buford, Co-Founder and Chief Visionary Officer of Live Unchained. Kathryn is also a writer, digital media consultant, and sociology Ph.D. student at the University of Maryland, College Park.

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Digital Sisterhood Leadership Project (#DSLead) Interview

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

I started using Twitter at the recommendation of my friend Michelle, Facebook (after a long hiatus) at the recommendation of my friend Ciara, and created a blog at the recommendation of my friend Abadeu. My friends were active on these outlets and they recommend I joined to promote my organization, my baby, Live Unchained.

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

Wow, I don’t think this is enough space 🙂 Personally, I have built some great relationships with artists, activists and experts across the country and world. Here, I’d like to give shout-outs to my friends Kristen Nicole (Texas) and Lucia Asue (Equatorial Guinea) who have been so supportive. And, our offline relationships first began with requests to feature them on Live Unchained. It’s help me realize that my organization can be everything I want it to be and more because I get to meet talented people from around the world who have great ideas to share. From a business perspective, it helps me to establish Live Unchained as a taste maker and international platform for women’s creative works across Africa and the diaspora. Also, Twitter, especially, helps me appreciate the beauty in brevity and not overthinking things.

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.”  Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings.  They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

Well, actually, it has taught me that sometimes being a leader means letting other people lead. Thanks to the persistent advice of one of my advisors, I learned to accept that I am not superwoman and cannot be on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and writing regular phenomenal blog posts 24/7. So, I’ve decided to take on interns to help out with our social media presence. And, as I lead them, I plan to play to their strengths and encourage them to share their own ideas. I want our collective internship experience to be an exercise in communal leadership.

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online.  In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: A Memoir of Fierce Living Online (2013), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others.  Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

I think that’s a great list and I think what I’m about to say is reflected in those roles. To that I would add that women lead through demonstrations of humanity. By that I mean, I’ve seen a lot of women share vulnerable emotional sides of them through their blog posts and social media that they normally wouldn’t share otherwise. And, these aren’t melodramatic women that just want some attention. I respect that and it has encouraged me to be bolder about what I reveal in the hopes that it will resonate with other women as well. One of my greatest inspirations concerning this kind of leadership is Minna Salami of www.msafropolitan.com.

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

As a doctoral student, I think I’m leading by example, showing how scholars can use social media to pursue entrepreneurial endeavors and engage people outside of academia.

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

Well, I’ve published so many of these lessons as Twitter and Facebook posts, so I’ll quote my own self here.  I’ve learned: You can’t wait for other people to “get” what you’re doing before you start doing it. Just because you’re not getting the results you want, when you want, doesn’t mean you’re not doing anything right. You’re unchained when uncertainty stops stopping you. Three things an artist must protect are their time, energy and emotional well-being. Have fun, but never surf without protection

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

Yes. But, they’re still in the oven, so I’m not really to pull them out yet 🙂

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

Ananda Leeke, Jessica Solomon (@jesssolomon), Lulu Kitololo (@afrilove), Minna Salami (@msafropolitan), Kristen Nicole (@kristennicole2), Laverne Wyatt (@lavernewyatt), Daisy Giles (@daisygiles), Kesha Bruce (@keshabruce) and Ciara Calbert (@blogofciarac) are some of my favorite social media women leaders. What I love about these women is that they write from a place of sincerity and take themselves seriously as entrepreneurs.

10) Share three ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

As far as expressing your personal leadership brand, I’d say it’s important to not overhink it. Recognize what’s important to you and let a theme emerge. If you look back over your life, you’ll see a theme in terms of your recurring interests. When it comes to defining your personal brand, I’d say note your personal core values like honest, creativity and freedom. Then ask yourself what colors and symbols reflect those core values. These colors and symbols can be combined to help create a simple clear logo and color scheme for your online presence.

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Melissa Bugaj


Photo Credit: Melissa Bugaj

Photo Credit: Melissa Bugaj

 

Photo Credit: NightLightStories.net

Photo Credit: NightLightStories.net

 

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Melissa Bugaj, co-founder of NightLifeStories.net and According to Mags blog.

Fun Facts: Digital Sisterhood Network founder Ananda Leeke met Melissa during the Podcasting 101 session at the BlogHer 2012 Conference in New York City. After the session, they chatted about Melissa’s podcast series. Ananda became an instant fan!

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Digital Sisterhood Leadership Project (#DSLead) Interview

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

I began using social media in 2008 when we started our podcast, Night Light Stories. I started a Facebook page and then followed with a Twitter page.

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

Social media has allowed me to connect with other people who share the same interests. It also has given me opportunities to learn more about podcasting and blogging. I’ve been able to utilize social media to view professionals in this area and learn from their expertise.

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.”  Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings.  They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

Since we have been producing the podcast for five years, we have helped others who are launching podcasts or thinking of starting one. We gave them tips on what we have learned through the years.  An example would be when we asked to interview the “Mommy Podcast” founders. We compared stories and shared our recording skills which helped to improve our podcasts. Everyone had something to share.

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online.  In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: A Memoir of Fierce Living Online (2013), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others.  Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

Women are also trailblazers in social media. There are always new types of media or subjects to address. Women usually take a more sensitive subject and bring it into light with a little bit of sensitivity.

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

I am a storyteller, an educator, a creator, and an advocate for family time and providing positive learning to children.  We have built a community of listeners. I mentor my friends who are just starting out in the social media world. I promote myself and others who I find influential. You should always share other resources that are positive and useful. I think that by working together and supporting each other, that can help to build a strong sense of community.

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

I have learned that you are nothing without the support of others around you. Everyone out there has something to offer. You never know how you can help someone each day. Wen you do help someone, it makes you feel like you are contributing. You can’t do it all on your own and finding people who can share ideas is invaluable.

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

I would really like to be able to expand my leadership roles in the digital space. One thing I would like to do is apply to speak at conferences about podcasting or writing. I feel that after five years of experience of producing this podcast with my husband, we have some useful information and tips to share.

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

One of my favorite social media women leaders is Mur Lafferty, host of “I Should Be Writing” and the editor of Escape Pod (science fiction podcast). Mur is a writer who interviews other authors on her podcast in order to learn from them and share valuable writing and publishing tips with her listeners.

I also admire MommyCast founders Gretchen and Paige. They were one of the first groups of “mommy podcasters.” They interview the latest movies, products, and ideas for raising kids.

10) Share three ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

In the 21st century, women are providing a multi-model experience. This is a way to draw in a maximum amount listeners and readers. It will help make others to feel comfortable in communicating with you as a host if you are seen in writing, video, and audio.

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Maggie Arden


Photo Credit: Maggie Arden

Photo Credit: Maggie Arden

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Maggie Arden, founder of Southern Yankee Speaks blog.

Fun Facts: Digital Sisterhood Network founder Ananda Leeke discovered Maggie’s fantastic blog posts while visiting the Feminism 2.0 web site. She later invited Maggie to participate in Digital Sisterhood Radio’s Feminism Online Project Series in 2011. Click here to listen to a recording of their conversation.

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Digital Sisterhood Leadership Project (#DSLead) Interview

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

I have kept in touch with family and friends, expand my professional circle, and promote and raise money for issues I can about from women’s issues, to the environment to health issues.  I also am able to keep up with organizations I support and spread the word about their work.

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

I have kept in touch with family and friends, expand my professional circle, and promote and raise money for issues I can about from women’s issues, to the environment to health issues.  I also am able to keep up with organizations I support and spread the word about their work.

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.”  Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings.  They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

Social media has helped me find organizations to get involved with, which have led to leadership positions.  My work at Fem2.0, and my role there has allowed me to take the lead on various projects, and act as a representative of the organization at in person events in my area, as well as helping me develop as a professional and board member.

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online.  In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: A Memoir of Fierce Living Online (2013), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others.  Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

The list of roles in incredible, and incorporates much of what I see women doing online.  I also see women as innovators in how social media is being used for advocacy, community buildings and story telling.  Women have also found new ways to connect a physical group through social media.

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

My goal is to always be advocating or promoting an issue of importance to me.  I also act as a curator and story teller through my writing and work to bring other women’s writing to my online network.

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

Starting out it was a little scary to throw up a tweet with my thoughts and opinions for the world to see.  My thoughts are my thoughts and they can’t be wrong.  They can be changed by others just like I can change someone else’s.  For as much as you end up teaching others, it’s important to try to learn as well.  Follow people you disagree with – it will help you form your opinions and a strong response – even if you never share it with them.

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

I am working to find new and different blogs to write for, and expand my knowledge and writing to other issues and areas I am passionate about.

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

Melissa Harris Perry has done an amazing job using Twitter to start a discussion on feminism, race and gender, and encouraging and including her students in the process and showing them a worthwhile use of new media. Joan Bamberger has taken on the mommy-blogger stereotype and shown how women (and moms specifically) are and can affect change in politics. Lisa Maatz does an amazing job educating and advocating for women’s issues  online, as well as on the Hill.

10) Share three ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

  • Pick your issues, promote, education and discuss them through social media and share the results of the discussion.
  • Show a little of yourself.  When presenting a professional persona it can be hard to lighten up and share a personal side, but it helps people connect and better understand you.
  • Don’t be shy. Without interaction we don’t connect and the social aspect is lost.  Everyone is an expert in something and in everything else we are all students.  Social Media is a great way to share your expertise and learn the rest from others.

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Jana Baldwin


Photo Credit: Jana Baldwin

Photo Credit: Jana Baldwin

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Jana Baldwin, founder of Northwest to Southeast blog.

 

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Digital Sisterhood Leadership Project (#DSLead) Interview

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

I started using Facebook in 2005.

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

Social media has helped me connect with friends, gain employment, gain a graduate degree, communicate with community, and develop relationships with nonprofit organizations.

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.”  Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings.  They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

At this point I am hoping to make a career utilizing social media.

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online.  In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: A Memoir of Fierce Living Online (2013), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others.  Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

Provide relevant, specific information during emergencies.

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

Public Safety Chair in my neighborhood and Public Health Communications and Marketing expert.

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

Networking and writing.

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

My plans include improving my  website and building mobile apps.

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

One of my favorite social media women leaders is Tracey Webb, founder of BlackGivesBack.com. We have built a relationship by meeting online. As a result, I became a part of Tracey’s Black Benefactors organization. She has given me motivation and strength in a community that I need.

10) Share three ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

Women can share their expertise, opinions, and emergency information to define and express their personal leadership brand.