Ananda Leeke’s Talk on Social Media Leadership Coming to BlogHer 2013 in July!


Photo Credit: BlogHer.com

Photo Credit: BlogHer.com

Happy Digital Sisterhood Wednesday!

I am really excited to share that I will be giving a talk on social media leadership at the BlogHer conference on July 26. What Type of Social Media Leader Are You? is the title  of my presentation. The presentation will give me an opportunity to share my thoughts on social media women’s leadership and to introduce the Digital Sisterhood Leadership Project to a larger audience. I am so grateful to the BlogHer team for giving me a platform to share my leadership thoughts and work.

The BlogHer 13′ conference will mark my fifth year of participation. BLOGHER-WOW! It’s gonna rock! So get ready Chicago!

Remember to tweet your digital sisters a hello message today in celebration of #DigitalSisterhood Wednesday on Twitter!

Enjoy your day!

Ananda

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Deborah Shane


Photo Credit: Deborah Shane

Photo Credit: Deborah Shane

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Deborah Shane, a Top 100 Small Business Champion, Career Transition Author, Personal Branding Strategist, Media Host, Writer, and Speaker.

Fun Facts: Digital Sisterhood Network (DSN) founder Ananda Leeke and Deborah met while serving on the Podcasting 101 Panel at the BlogHer 2012 Conference in New York City. While working with Deborah to prepare for the panel discussion, Ananda became a huge fan of her work!  

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Digital Sisterhood Leadership Project (#DSLead) Interview:

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

I was an early adopter with using  email. I started seriously using social media in 2007 when I launched my consultancy and training company to build my community and reach.

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

Build communication bridges, communities and conversations about the issues and professional areas I advocate for and am passionate about.

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.”  Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings.  They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

I am tapped and sought out for speaking, writing and community projects. I host a blog, but also write for several prominent blogs in my professional space, and host a weekly radio podcast that is now up to 94,000 downloads and pageviews, on BlogtalkRadio.

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online.  In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: A Memoir of Fierce Living Online (2013), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others.  Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

I am seeing women in politics, government, medical, social issues, entertainment and philanthropy using social media to build reach and impact. We just heard and saw Martha Stewart, Katie Couric and Soledad OBrien at the Blogher 12 talk about their activities and how social media is a central driver of awareness.

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

I was named a Top 100 Small Business Champion for 2012 by SmallBizTrends.com!

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

Give, share, connect and receive and watch what happens! Niche communities of people are gathering, and finding each other to advance passion and causes!

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

I plan to continue to contribute and engage and know that more doors will open to serve and help.

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

There are so many great examples of women demonstrating leadership using social media. I am so grateful to see how it is advancing the impact women have today and will continue to have as the generations shift.

10) Share three ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

  • Blog and write about things you are passionate and knowledgeable about regularly.
  • Support and advocate for other people who you believe in, admire and want to emulate.
  • Connect and introduce great people to each other who have you in common and build your tribes!

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Tomika DePriest


Photo Credit: Tomika DePriest

Photo Credit: Tomika DePriest

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Tomika DePriest, Director of Communications at Spelman College.

Fun Facts: Digital Sisterhood Network (DSN) founder Ananda Leeke and Tomika are both from Michigan. They met during Digital Doyennes: Wisdom from the Women who Lead in Social Media and Digital Innovation, an event sponsored by Spelman College’s Digital Moving Image Salon and Women in Film and Television Atlanta in 2011. They reconnected during Spelman’s  Women of Color Leadership Conference in 2012. They continue to support each other online and offline. 

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Digital Sisterhood Leadership Project (#DSLead) Interview:

1) How can people find you online?

2) When did you start using social media?

I started using social media in 2006.

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

Social media has allowed me to make global connections, get real-time feedback, and engage others in a cause.

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.”  Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings.  They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

I’ve used social media to leverage my leadership role by placing management of these tools under the operation of the Office of Communications at Spelman College.

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online.  In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: A Memoir of Fierce Living Online (2013), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others.  Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

Spelman College faculty use social media as a teaching and learning engagement tool. Writing blogs, Twitter chats and YouTube video are just some examples.

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

I serve as the Team leader for the launch of the Interactive Unit in Spelman’s Office of Communications, which includes Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, LinkedIn, a digital magazine titled Inside Spelman, a weekly e-mail newsletter titled Spelman Connection, and www.spelman.edu.

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

To always be a student of field, but to not try to be all things to all people. It’s most important to place stakes where the majority of your primary constituents reside.

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

I plan to continue working with the Spelman team to keep the college on the cutting edge of technology as it relates to engaging constituents in the digital sphere.

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

Patricia Cesaire, Director of Social Media Strategy at Black Enterprise (BE) is one of my favorite social media women leaders because of the way she uses the platform to position BE’s brand as a go-to source of commentary for business, technology, and tech news and information.

10) Share three ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

  • Use it to blog daily tips or thoughts on a particular topic.
  • Use it to host 20-minute Twitter or Facebook chats on a timely topic.
  • Use it to generate focus group- type feedback on concepts, designs or marketing ideas.

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Nicole Cutts


Photo Credit: Nicole Cutts

Photo Credit: Nicole Cutts

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Nicole Cutts, founder of Cutts Consulting, Vision Quest Retreats and Women-Owned Business Wednesdays on Facebook.

Fun Facts: Digital Sisterhood Network (DSN) founder Ananda Leeke and Nicole met via Women for Change’s online community created by Niambi Jarvis, founder of Hiyaah Power. They met in person during a Fabulous Women Business Owners DC meeting in 2010. They reconnected over breakfast with Marie Isabel Laurion at Teaism. Their breakfast meeting led to a podcast and Digital Sisterhood Radio interview that promoted Vision Quest Retreats’ Taking your Dreams from Design to Destiny: The Next Level Conference. Nicole invited Ananda to speak at the Conference. Since then, they have supported each other online and offline.

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Digital Sisterhood Leadership Project (#DSLead) Interview:

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

I started using social media to network for my business; Vision Quest Retreats, and as a platform to share my content. I also knew I could learn a lot from the women on the web.

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

It’s allowed me to connect with so many people but especially women who I would not have otherwise known. It’s also allowed me a place to host forums and build a community to bring women together since this is what I love to do. It really has opened avenues for me to amazing people and I love this since I work at home by myself.

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.”  Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings.  They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

Hosting my Vision Quest Retreats and Women Owned Business Wednesdays forums has allowed me another space in which to facilitate discussions that uplift and inspire women to live their visions of success and to be able to better navigate the heroine’s journey. The online forums augment what I also do in “real life” when I have live events. The social media platforms also give women access to what we do at live events who can’t otherwise participate.

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online.  In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: A Memoir of Fierce Living Online (2013), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others.  Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

I think you covered it!

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

Maybe I’m being egotistical but I think I play all of these roles to some extent; advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

  • Build it and they will come.
  • You can find important members of your tribe in the digital space.
  • Even though it’s digital it still takes time to build.

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

I introduced a new character to the digital space. She’s a sort of comic heroine figure who captures the spirit of social media. I’m going to let her fly with whatever ideas come to her. I introduced her at my May 18, 2012 event called Reclaiming the Goddess that was held at International Visions Gallery in Washington, D.C.

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

  • Ananda Leeke – because of her determination and beautiful spirit
  • Stacey Ferguson – for her great ideas and ability to get powerful women together

10) Share three ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

  • Post content that represents their brand.
  • Use the power to connect and support others.
  • Be consistent and responsive to people.

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Latoicha Phillips Givens


Photo Credit: Latoicha Givens

Photo Credit: Latoicha Givens

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Latoicha Phillips Givens, founder of Luxetips.com, a lifestyle online magazine dedicated to providing women all over the world “luxetips” in beauty, fashion, travel, automobiles, and kids items. Latoicha is also an attorney and founding partner of the firm, Phillips Givens LLC. Her practice includes representation of start-ups, small, and mid-sized businesses in intellectual property matters. She was named 2012 Digital Sister of the Year – Lifestylista.

Fun Facts: Digital Sisterhood Network (DSN) founder Ananda Leeke met Latoicha at the first Blogalicious Weekend Conference held in Atlanta, Georgia in 2009. Ananda attended Latoicha’s session on“Possibilities and Pitfalls of Having YOU on the Net.”  A few months later, Latoicha appeared as a guest on Digital Sisterhood Radio. Since then, they have reconnected at the BlogHer conferences and at the Digitini  event sponsored by Everywhere in Atlanta.

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Digital Sisterhood Leadership Project (#DSLead) Interview:

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

I started using social media in 2007.

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

It has allowed me to gain greater exposure as an intellectual property attorney specializing in legal issues in social media. It has also allowed me to meet extraordinary people and expand my network nation and worldwide.

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.”  Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings.  They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

Social media has given me a platform to showcase my intellectual property law practice through my blog, social media accounts and speaking engagements at social media conferences.

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online.  In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: A Memoir of Fierce Living Online (2013), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others.  Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

Women have become role models, business leaders, and motivators to other women by using social media tools.

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

I play the role of an educator, helper, and a resource for people who need help in navigating legal issues in social media.

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

I have learned to be successful in social media through engagement with others; always creating and sharing good content; and paying it forward by helping others become successful in the social media space.

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

I have plans to continue to do more speaking engagements and webinars to educate individuals on the legal pitfalls of social media.

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

Renee J. Ross: Renee is a wonderful success story. She has been able to build a huge social media network in a short period of time. She is now a consultant and a leading mommy blogger in social media circles.

Angela Benton: Angela is a leader and innovator in creating content from an African American perspective. She has used her success to now help minorities gain visibility and investors in Silicon Valley.

10) Share three ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

  • Put out great content.
  • Help others by sharing their content.
  • Develop your craft and become an expert in their field.

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Julia Coney


Photo Credit: Julia Coney

Photo Credit: Julia Coney

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Julia Coney, editor and founder of AllAboutThePretty.net, a niche lifestyle website that is dedicated to curated information on beauty, travel, food, and yoga. Julia was named 2012 Digital Sister of the Year – Lifestylista.

Fun Facts: Julia and Digital Sisterhood Network (DSN) founder Ananda Leeke were born on the same day in December, live in Washington, D.C., and love France, traveling, yoga, and Tranquil Space yoga studio. They followed each other on various social media platforms for several years before meeting in person at the DSN Fierce Living in Fashion Tweet Up held at Violet Boutique in 2011. Ananda enjoys reading about Julia’s beauty and lifestyle adventures (especially her Paris Beauty Bloggers Trip in October 2012) on AllAboutThePretty.net because they inspire her to  live a beautiful and bold life!

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Digital Sisterhood Leadership Project (#DSLead) Interview:

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

I started using social media in 2008..

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

Social media has allowed me to meet unique individuals, expand my business, and create a sense of community for myself.

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.”  Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings.  They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

Social media has allowed me to have a diverse readership. I’ve met readers all over the world through my travels. I’m also able to keep in touch with new friends in far away places because of social media. I used social media on my writing assignment in Buenos Aires. I put a mention on Twitter, which was read by a friend, which was given to a food blogger, who invited me to dinner at a supper club in Buenos Aires. It was wonderful and never would have happened any other way.

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online.  In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: A Memoir of Fierce Living Online (2013), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others.  Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

Wow. I think you knocked them all out of the park. But, I would also add connector.

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

I play the role of creator, curator, educator, influencer, and storyteller. My site is a story of my life and how I live.

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

Keep learning. It constantly changes and you must stay up on the changes.

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

I’m still working this part out.

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

My favorite social media women leaders include Sloane Davidson, Bevy Smith, Ananda Leeke, the Blogalicious ladies, Shameeka Ayers, and too many to name.

10) Share three ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

  • We can use social media to ignite the world of their own true power and personal brand.
  • We can connect with like-minded women, promote other women, and stay engaged in the social media world.
  • Also, don’t put anything out in the social media world that you would not want to be read on the front page of the New York Times.

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Christine Celise Johnson


Photo Credit: Christine Johnson

Photo Credit: Christine Johnson

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Christine Celise Johnson, founder of IamDtech. Christine was named 2012 Digital Sister of the Year – Empowerista.

Fun Facts: Digital Sisterhood Network founder Ananda Leeke met Christine a few years ago while hanging out in front of Busboys and Poets in Washington, DC. They exchanged contact information and began following each other on Facebook and Twitter. When Christine launched IamDtech, Ananda became an instant fan and supporter.

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Digital Sisterhood Leadership Project (#DSLead) Interview:

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

I began engaging via social media very hesitantly sometime prior to 2008 by using MySpace at my sister’s encouragement. From there I discovered Facebook and found it to be an awesome way to nurture present relationships and develop others. It was the perfect platform to do what I do very naturally – communicate and share myself. But then I discovered Twitter and it rocked my universe! My world exploded and that became the most amazing media for me professionally.

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

Social media has extended my reach professionally in exponential ways. I have been able to rebuild my personal brand using social media as well as build my business. I hit the ground running with nothing more than a Twitter handle and a dream almost a year ago.

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.”  Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings.  They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

It has helped me make connections and develop relationships with some key players in my industry. A well orchestrated tweet or follow can be life changing.

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online.  In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: A Memoir of Fierce Living Online (2013), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others.  Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

Healers

The spiritual feminine runs amok via words of love, kindness, inspirational quotes, encouragement and verse.

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

I am a connector. I connect my Facebook Group members, Twitter followers, and friends with relevant and timely information via social media. I also create awareness around the topic of diversity in technology.

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

Don’t just post, tweet or otherwise for the heck of it. Provide relevant substance; unique content.

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

Yes, it’s a secret. (-:

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

Elianna Ramos @ERGeekGoddess is the quintessential digital sistah community builder.

10) Share three ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

  • Share relevant information related to a topic of interest. Become the go to for information
  • Blog, blog, and blog.
  • Utilize video as an avenue to provide commentary and introduce yourself to audiences.

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Suzanne Turner


Photo Credit: Suzanne Turner

Photo Credit: Suzanne Turner

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Suzanne Turner, founder of Turner Strategies, Inc. and Feminism 2.0 (Fem 2.0). Suzanne was named 2012 Digital Sister of the Year – Evangelista.

Fun Facts: Digital Sisterhood Network founder Ananda Leeke met Suzanne while sitting in the audience during the Fem 2.0 conference’s closing session in 2009. They struck up a conversation about the power of women. A few days later, Ananda wrote a poem about her conference experience and sent it to Suzanne and her Fem 2.0 team. They posted it on the Fem 2.0 web site (one of Ananda’s favorite online destinations). The positive feedback Ananda received from the Fem 2.0 community inspired her to develop a digital project that celebrates women online. Since then, they have reconnected and spent time chatting during the Blogalicious Weekend Conference and TEDxAdamsMorganWomen event.

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Digital Sisterhood Leadership Project (#DSLead) Interview:

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

I embraced every new tool as soon as it came out, since waaaaay back in the 1990s. I love to drive the conversation and listen to others on many important issues. Plus it’s fun to reconnect and stay connected with all sorts of people.

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

Social media has allowed me to create and participate in amazing communities – both personal and professional. It has allowed me to make new friends, keep old ones, and create alliances with new partners-in-crime in social change.

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.”  Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings.  They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

Social media has helped me transform old ways of doing social change into new, vibrant more dynamic and interactive programs. As a co-founder of Feminism 2.0, I helped to introduce the women’s advocacy community to social media (many powerful websites and amazing bloggers were already active, but the offline organizations had not yet caught up).

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online.  In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: A Memoir of Fierce Living Online (2013), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others.  Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

They use their social media venues to extend their reach and influence in their own unique voices.

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

  • Specialist in particular types of information
  • Agent of social change
  • Mom
  • Friend
  • Agitator

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

Patience and generosity are key to online success. Give other people credit as much as you possibly can.

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

Yes, I am becoming much more active in online community building for social issues.

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

  • Soraya Chemaly, an amazing blogger and new voice
  • Shireen Mitchell, who knows everything and everyone
  • Gloria Pan, an extremely creative thinker who is always behind the scenes
  • Kristin Rowe Finkbeiner, the dynamo behind the success of MomsRising
  • Violet Tsagkas, editor of Fem2pt0
  • Sarah Burris – living her life outloud on her blog and using her skills to help unions
  • Elana Levin, amazing on and offline organizer
  • Rachel Perrone, who speaks social media as well as any other language

There are too many others to name.

10) Share three ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

  • Speak up about things that are important to you.
  • Speak from the heart.
  • Be generous in everything — especially with link love. Tweet love, resources, and time.

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Monica A. Coleman


Photo Credit: Monica A. Coleman

Photo Credit: Monica A. Coleman

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Monica A. Coleman, author, founder of Beautiful Mind blog, minister, and professor. Monica was named 2012 Digital Sister of the Year – Enchantista.

Fun Facts: Monica and Digital Sisterhood Network founder Ananda Leeke were introduced via Facebook by their mutual friend, Professor Shayne Lee. Once Ananda started following Monica on Twitter and reading her blog, she became an instant fan. Monica was featured as a guest on Digital Sisterhood Radio’s Feminism Online Project series in 2011.

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Digital Sisterhood Leadership Project (#DSLead) Interview:

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

I think I joined Facebook in 2007 and it went from there . . .

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

Personally, it allows me to keep in contact with family and friends across the years and miles. I’ve moved a lot and it helps me to feel connected with people I care about. Professionally, I’ve been able to connect with people I may never meet in person even as we have shared interests. We can share information; I learn a lot from the people I follow on Twitter. When I have marketing decisions to make for my business, I’ll ask my tweeps and Facebook fans and get really great responses. Also, social media spreads the work and writing I do into arenas I would not ordinarily be a part of. The work in social media has not only helped recruit students to my institution (where I teach), but has directly increased my consulting work, writing, features in other media, and speaking engagements. People will literally say, “I read your blog/ follow you on twitter/ watched video on your website . . . and thought you would be great for X or Y.”

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.”  Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings.  They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

My blog on faith and depression has been a real blessing for me and a ministry. I’ve received emails from people in India and Haiti who read my blog and say that particular entries really encouraged them – even in a context so different from my own. My most recent book was titled from an email I received from someone in an inpatient care center who read my blog and said that it helped her to feel like she is not alone. The book is entitled Not Alone: Reflections on Faith and Depression. As I’ve pushed myself to share more of my experiences and struggles, I’ve found many people – men and women (but it seems to be primarily women) who relate, but have not heard their experiences given voice as they should be.

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online.  In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: A Memoir of Fierce Living Online (2013), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others.  Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

The 12 roles listed here seem fairly thorough.

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

Advocate and educator

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

Social media breaks down barriers that I find in face-to-face encounters such that I connect with people I might meet or choose to befriend in other settings. Thus I’d say that social media activity can really broaden our worlds. Some topics are easier to talk about and learn about online – with a level of anonymity. My work is in sexual and domestic violence and mental health advocacy. There are still stigmas in these areas and being online often gives people spaces to learn about and grow and express in ways that are more comfortable for sensitive topics.

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

My plans include publicizing my recent book primarily online – through Twitter and Facebook campaigns, a virtual book tour, and a book trailer video. I hope to do more classes online – marketed almost completely through social media.

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

  • Melissa Harris-Perry is just a media maven for her website,Twitter, Facebook, and MSNBC.
  • The Crunk Feminist Collective  work together as a collective, and are bold, passionate and vulnerable about a variety of topics related to black feminism.
  • Najeeba Syeed-Miller is committed to interreligious dialogue and brings a lot of insight to her tweets and Facebook status updates.
  • Thema Bryant-Davis has this great Twitter therapy with insightful and pithy truisms that are real inspiration. She also has an online radio program that advocates women’s health.

10) Share three ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

  • Blogging about their commitments – thereby serving as advocates who educate.
  • Twitter is great for growing a circle of friends and followers – expanding one’s market.
  • Through webinars, teleconferences, online classes, blogs, online radio etc. women can establish themselves as experts in their fields and gain a global following that is simply not possible in person.

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Veronica Woods


Photo Credit: Veronica Woods

Photo Credit: Veronica Woods

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Veronica Woods, founder of My Salon Scoop Consulting and author of The A-List Salon: Inside Secrets of How Profitable Salons WOW Their Clients Every Day. Veronica was named 2012 Digital Sister of the Year – Empowerista.

Fun Facts: Veronica and Digital Sisterhood Network founder Ananda Leeke are members of Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc. They met for the first time during Sigma’s national conference in Palm Springs, California. During the conference, Ananda interviewed Veronica for her YouTube channel. Veronica appeared as a guest on Digital Sisterhood Radio and was featured as a guest blogger during Digital Sisterhood Month 2011.

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Digital Sisterhood Leadership Project (#DSLead) Interview:

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

I started to use social media as a means to get the word out for my first website. I wanted to reach women across the major cities with a limited budget. I understood that social media allowed me to reach people by their interests easily.

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

It has allowed me to connect with people who have similar goals that I would not otherwise have known exist. Almost anyone can be just one or two tweets away.

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.”  Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings.  They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

When I started with my online resource for African-American women about hair, I knew that the online information available was fragmented and oftentimes with incorrect information. While most online beauty blogs and such posted information about individual’s personal experiences, I went the extra mile to interview beauty pros. I have found by just presenting information with credible sources and good content, you can just claim your spot.

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online.  In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: A Memoir of Fierce Living Online (2013), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others.  Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

Connector

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

Social do gooder, educator, motivator, promoter, and thought leader

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

Remember to preserve your brand when posting. People are watching. I know that everyone will not agree with everything that I post, but I want to always stay true to how I want my overall business to be perceived.

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

I would like to play a bigger thought leader role. I would like to foster more honest communication between the salon professional and consumer communities. I would like more to also spill offline where it can make a big difference.

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

Mari Smith is one of my favorites. She provides her up-to-the minute updates on changes that make a difference to her followers. As influential as she is, she keeps a very down-to-earth persona. I aspire to do the same.

10) Share three ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

  • If you are an expert in a field, create your own hashtag and tweet tips using it.
  • Upload candid photos of you “doing your thing” on social media. So remember to take photos.
  • Promote others. Who you promote says a lot about you.