#DigitalSisterhood Wednesday at Social Media Week DC 2013’s PRSA NCC Breakfast


smweekdc2013

Happy #DigitalSisterhood Wednesday!

Guess what’s happening this week? Social Media Week! That means lots of opportunities for me to connect with and learn from digital sisters and brothers in Washington, D.C.

Are you attending or following Social Media Week events in your city or another city?

What have been your favorite events so far?

Denise Graveline and Anthony Shop

Denise Graveline and Anthony Shop

PRSA NCC Social Media Week DC 2013 Event

PRSA NCC Social Media Week DC 2013 Event

This morning, I attended a great Social Media Week DC panel discussion on 2013 social media communications trends for communicators featuring Denise Graveline, founder of Don’t Get Caught, and Anthony Shop, managing director of Social Driver. It was sponsored by the Public Relations Society of America’s National Capital Chapter.

Denise Graveline

Denise Graveline

My biggest takeaways were three of the trends Graveline discussed in her presentation: Visual, Mobile, and Integrated. They are now my “VMI” communications strategy for the Digital Sisterhood Network. Click here to read Graveline’s fantastic blog post about her trends.

Digital Sisterhood Network founder Ananda Leeke at PRSA NCC Social Media Week DC 2013 event

Digital Sisterhood Network founder Ananda Leeke at PRSA NCC Social Media Week DC 2013 event

Here are some of my notes from the presentation.

1) Visual

Graveline stated that visual content is the strongest trend in social media that will increase in 2013. So that means it is time to return to my 2011 passion for videos. Here I come YouTube, Animoto, Vimeo, Vine, Facebook video chats, UStream livestreaming, and Google Hangout! It’s time my brother Matt give me editing lessons too.

My love affair for “all things photo” will continue to play itself out on Flickr, Instagram, and Pinterest.

2) Mobile

Graveline shared some interesting statistics about mobile technology users. According to the Harvard Business Review, 46 percent of mobile phone users like you and me use their smartphones for “ME” time. Yes I said “ME” time — pure relaxation, fun, and entertainment. I totally agreed. She talked about how mobile devices give more people access to the web. She also stressed the importance of making sure blogs and web sites are optimized for mobile devices.

3) Integrated

Graveline stressed the value of having one online site as a “base camp” (I like this phrase) for your messages and content. Social media platforms should be used to amplify the messages and content.

She talked about how some folks create a roadblock in their communication efforts by thinking of social media as something you have to add to your long list of things to do rather than as a tool that  enhances your communications efforts. She suggested these folks transform their attitude and accept that social media is how they do business. In short, EMBRACE IT. It’s not going anywhere. It’s here to stay.

She recommended using blog posts instead of press releases or major announcements to achieve better search engine results and connections with reporters.

PS: If you like what you read on Graveline’s blog, click here to subscribe to it. I did. I am also following her on Twitter and Pinterest. She is my new favorite Digital Sisterhood Leader! She rocks!

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Latoicha Phillips Givens


Photo Credit: Latoicha Givens

Photo Credit: Latoicha Givens

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Latoicha Phillips Givens, founder of Luxetips.com, a lifestyle online magazine dedicated to providing women all over the world “luxetips” in beauty, fashion, travel, automobiles, and kids items. Latoicha is also an attorney and founding partner of the firm, Phillips Givens LLC. Her practice includes representation of start-ups, small, and mid-sized businesses in intellectual property matters. She was named 2012 Digital Sister of the Year – Lifestylista.

Fun Facts: Digital Sisterhood Network (DSN) founder Ananda Leeke met Latoicha at the first Blogalicious Weekend Conference held in Atlanta, Georgia in 2009. Ananda attended Latoicha’s session on“Possibilities and Pitfalls of Having YOU on the Net.”  A few months later, Latoicha appeared as a guest on Digital Sisterhood Radio. Since then, they have reconnected at the BlogHer conferences and at the Digitini  event sponsored by Everywhere in Atlanta.

DSN_LLL150

Digital Sisterhood Leadership Project (#DSLead) Interview:

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

I started using social media in 2007.

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

It has allowed me to gain greater exposure as an intellectual property attorney specializing in legal issues in social media. It has also allowed me to meet extraordinary people and expand my network nation and worldwide.

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.”  Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings.  They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

Social media has given me a platform to showcase my intellectual property law practice through my blog, social media accounts and speaking engagements at social media conferences.

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online.  In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: A Memoir of Fierce Living Online (2013), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others.  Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

Women have become role models, business leaders, and motivators to other women by using social media tools.

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

I play the role of an educator, helper, and a resource for people who need help in navigating legal issues in social media.

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

I have learned to be successful in social media through engagement with others; always creating and sharing good content; and paying it forward by helping others become successful in the social media space.

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

I have plans to continue to do more speaking engagements and webinars to educate individuals on the legal pitfalls of social media.

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

Renee J. Ross: Renee is a wonderful success story. She has been able to build a huge social media network in a short period of time. She is now a consultant and a leading mommy blogger in social media circles.

Angela Benton: Angela is a leader and innovator in creating content from an African American perspective. She has used her success to now help minorities gain visibility and investors in Silicon Valley.

10) Share three ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

  • Put out great content.
  • Help others by sharing their content.
  • Develop your craft and become an expert in their field.

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Julia Coney


Photo Credit: Julia Coney

Photo Credit: Julia Coney

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Julia Coney, editor and founder of AllAboutThePretty.net, a niche lifestyle website that is dedicated to curated information on beauty, travel, food, and yoga. Julia was named 2012 Digital Sister of the Year – Lifestylista.

Fun Facts: Julia and Digital Sisterhood Network (DSN) founder Ananda Leeke were born on the same day in December, live in Washington, D.C., and love France, traveling, yoga, and Tranquil Space yoga studio. They followed each other on various social media platforms for several years before meeting in person at the DSN Fierce Living in Fashion Tweet Up held at Violet Boutique in 2011. Ananda enjoys reading about Julia’s beauty and lifestyle adventures (especially her Paris Beauty Bloggers Trip in October 2012) on AllAboutThePretty.net because they inspire her to  live a beautiful and bold life!

DSN_LLL150

Digital Sisterhood Leadership Project (#DSLead) Interview:

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

I started using social media in 2008..

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

Social media has allowed me to meet unique individuals, expand my business, and create a sense of community for myself.

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.”  Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings.  They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

Social media has allowed me to have a diverse readership. I’ve met readers all over the world through my travels. I’m also able to keep in touch with new friends in far away places because of social media. I used social media on my writing assignment in Buenos Aires. I put a mention on Twitter, which was read by a friend, which was given to a food blogger, who invited me to dinner at a supper club in Buenos Aires. It was wonderful and never would have happened any other way.

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online.  In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: A Memoir of Fierce Living Online (2013), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others.  Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

Wow. I think you knocked them all out of the park. But, I would also add connector.

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

I play the role of creator, curator, educator, influencer, and storyteller. My site is a story of my life and how I live.

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

Keep learning. It constantly changes and you must stay up on the changes.

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

I’m still working this part out.

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

My favorite social media women leaders include Sloane Davidson, Bevy Smith, Ananda Leeke, the Blogalicious ladies, Shameeka Ayers, and too many to name.

10) Share three ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

  • We can use social media to ignite the world of their own true power and personal brand.
  • We can connect with like-minded women, promote other women, and stay engaged in the social media world.
  • Also, don’t put anything out in the social media world that you would not want to be read on the front page of the New York Times.

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Christine Celise Johnson


Photo Credit: Christine Johnson

Photo Credit: Christine Johnson

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Christine Celise Johnson, founder of IamDtech. Christine was named 2012 Digital Sister of the Year – Empowerista.

Fun Facts: Digital Sisterhood Network founder Ananda Leeke met Christine a few years ago while hanging out in front of Busboys and Poets in Washington, DC. They exchanged contact information and began following each other on Facebook and Twitter. When Christine launched IamDtech, Ananda became an instant fan and supporter.

DSN_LLL150

Digital Sisterhood Leadership Project (#DSLead) Interview:

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

I began engaging via social media very hesitantly sometime prior to 2008 by using MySpace at my sister’s encouragement. From there I discovered Facebook and found it to be an awesome way to nurture present relationships and develop others. It was the perfect platform to do what I do very naturally – communicate and share myself. But then I discovered Twitter and it rocked my universe! My world exploded and that became the most amazing media for me professionally.

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

Social media has extended my reach professionally in exponential ways. I have been able to rebuild my personal brand using social media as well as build my business. I hit the ground running with nothing more than a Twitter handle and a dream almost a year ago.

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.”  Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings.  They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

It has helped me make connections and develop relationships with some key players in my industry. A well orchestrated tweet or follow can be life changing.

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online.  In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: A Memoir of Fierce Living Online (2013), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others.  Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

Healers

The spiritual feminine runs amok via words of love, kindness, inspirational quotes, encouragement and verse.

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

I am a connector. I connect my Facebook Group members, Twitter followers, and friends with relevant and timely information via social media. I also create awareness around the topic of diversity in technology.

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

Don’t just post, tweet or otherwise for the heck of it. Provide relevant substance; unique content.

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

Yes, it’s a secret. (-:

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

Elianna Ramos @ERGeekGoddess is the quintessential digital sistah community builder.

10) Share three ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

  • Share relevant information related to a topic of interest. Become the go to for information
  • Blog, blog, and blog.
  • Utilize video as an avenue to provide commentary and introduce yourself to audiences.

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Danica Kombol


Photo Credit: Danica Kombol

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Danica Kombol, Managing and Founding Partner of Everywhere, a social media marketing firm.

FUN FACT: Digital Sisterhood Network founder Ananda Leeke met Danica at the Blogalicious Weekend Conference in 2010. After the conference, Ananda became a Heart of Haiti blogger ambassador and traveled to Haiti with Danica in 2011 (Everywhere represents Macy’s Heart of Haiti campaign; the firm also sponsored Ananda’s travel to Haiti).  During the trip, they forged a “Digital Sisterhood” lifetime bond as they shared many amazing moments as roommates! 

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

Hmmm…hard to say when I actually started. Do chat rooms count?

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

Connect, connect, connect! Expand my circles and acquire knowledge.

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.”  Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings.  They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

You know social media helps you get noticed in niche communities and in order to be a leader, people have to first “notice” you and know who you are!

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online.  In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: Fierce Living Online for 25 Years (Fall 2012), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others.  Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

Listener! We also go to social to listen!

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

I’m a big sharer. I love to share other people’s successes. I also use my platforms to share my causes.

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

To be humble.

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

I don’t approach the digital space from a point of view of leadership, I approach it more as an opportunity to commune so I will continue to commune!

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

Ananda Leeke, Charlene Li, Beth Kanter, and The Bloggess (because she’s so damn funny!)

10) Share three ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

  • Listen.
  • Share but don’t sell.
  • Promote other women.