Join Digital Sisterhood Network Founder Ananda Leeke at Press Publish Conference on March 28!


Press Publish Conference in Portland

Press Publish Conference in Portland

Greetings Digital Sisters

Digital Sisterhood Network founder Ananda Leeke is heading to Press Publish, WordPress’ first-ever conference featuring WordPress bloggers and the people behind WordPress.com, on March 27 and 28 in Portland, Oregon. While she’s at Press Publish, she’ll lead a session on “Blogging for Obama” that will give her an opportunity to share how she began blogging for personal reasons, evolved into a social media leader for the White House, and learned how to make the most of opportunities that have presented themselves as a result of her blogging adventures on March 28.

She’s also serve as a panelist for Michelle Langston’s session, “A Tale of Two Sites.” During this session, you’ll have a chance to look at her older AnandaLeeke.com web site and blog and learn how Michelle transformed them into a new and improved site that fully expresses her personality and online goals.

In addition to these sessions, you’ll be able to dive into a day of learning with presentations and tutorials led by an amazing group of speakers including Digital Sister of the Year Kathy Cano-Murillo, founder of the CrafyChica.com, on blogging 101, blogging on the go, going pro as a blogger, storytelling, turning your blog into a book or business, writing, WordPress design and plugins, and so much more. Click to see the schedule.

Oh yeah, you’ll get to attend a Friday evening mixer where you will meet your fellow bloggers, receive your attendee packet, and enjoy storytelling by Longreads, snacks, and libations.

Guess what? The generous and groovy Press Publish team is offering a special 40% discount to the conference! Click here and use the special coupon code SISTERHOOD40 to register. One last thing — your ticket purchase also gets you a 1-year subscription to the WordPress Premium upgrade, a $99 value, that you can use on any WordPress.com blog. A coupon code and instructions on how to redeem it will be included in your ticket confirmation email.

See you in Portland!

Meet Digital Sister Leader Ericka Tinsley — She’s headed to #Blogalicious12!


Photo Credit: Ericka Tinsley

Meet Digital Sister Leader Ericka Tinsley, Chief Blogger of The Swarthy Suite and founder of the Fro-Fi Collective and Chocolate Chat Atlanta.

Fun Facts: Digital Sisterhood Network founder Ananda Leeke and Ericka first met at the Blogalicious Weekend Conference held in Miami in 2010. In 2011, Ericka and Ananda reconnected at Spelman College’s  Digital Doyennes: Wisdom from the Women who Lead in Social Media and Digital Innovation in Atlanta. This year they spent time together at Everywhere’s Digitini event in Atlanta. Ericka will be speaking about community building through collaboration on September 30, 2012, at the Blogalicious Weekend Conference in Las Vegas, Nevada. Check her out if you are headed to Vegas!

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

I started using social media when I launched a t-shirt business online people with natural hair.

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

Social media has helped me meet cool people, participate in social campaigns, travel to conferences, and work with companies and brands.

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.” Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings. They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

I have been able to co-create a business and social media networking event called Chocolate Chat: www.chocolatechatatlanta.com.

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online. In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: Fierce Living Online for 25 Years (Fall 2012), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others. Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

Brand ambassadors and video bloggers

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

Blogger, video blogger, speaker, teacher, accessibility assistant for social media for people with disabilities, and tweet-up coordinator

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

We have a voice that people listen to and follow. So be very careful how you influence your viewers.

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

Yes. Teaching social media online.

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

  • Blogalicious co-founder Stacey Ferguson and the Blogalicious community of women
  • Danica Kombol, co-founder and managing partner of Everywhere
  • Ananda Leeke

10) Share several ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

Establish a niche and audience as a nonprofit organization to teach women and men all over the world.

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Arielle Loren


Photo Credit: Arielle Loren

 

Photo Credit: Arielle Loren

 

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Arielle Loren, writer, activist, and founder of Corset Magazine.

Fun Facts: Arielle has been a guest on Digital Sisterhood Radio. In her 2011 interview with Digital Sisterhood Network founder Ananda Leeke, she shared her thoughts about her digital experiences, writing career, travel plans, and feminism online. Click here to listen to the show.  Ananda loves reading Arielle’s articles on Clutch Magazine. Arielle will be speaking about how she created her distinctive erotic territory online during The Personal: Erotica Out in the Open session on August 4, 2012, at the BlogHer Conference in New York City.  

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

I started using social media merely to connect with people who I knew in real life. My relationship with social media morphed into a way to connect with people who I both knew in real life and people who I didn’t know, but all of whom have similar interests to my work as a sexuality writer and owner of Corset Magazine, the go-to magazine for all things sexuality.

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

Social media has allowed me to connect with like-minded people championing women’s and sexual empowerment. It’s allowed me to build an awesome community of sex-curious readers for Corset Magazine, and gain a family-like following for my freelance writing.

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.”  Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings.  They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

I am truly thankful that social media has allowed me to build an amazing, close-knit following of friends that support my work and entrepreneurial endeavors. I’m often the go-to woman for sexuality advice and writing in my network circles, which has led to numerous opportunities to connect with my social media friends offline as well.

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online.  In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: Fierce Living Online for 25 Years (Fall 2012), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others.  Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

Women are truly social media healers, as many of us use our feminine energy and nurturing skills to reaffirm other women and men in need of empowerment. Healers are leaders, and the connections that we form online are not merely coincidental. I believe they’ve transformed into a channel for inspiring greater good.

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

I definitely consider myself a community builder, content curator, healer, influencer, and motivator on my social media networks. All of these roles are part of my personality, and I bring my authentic self to all of my social media outlets.

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

I’ve learned that people are listening and reading what you post even when you think they’re not. I’m always surprised when I meet people, both strangers and “real-life” friends who follow my social media musings, even if they don’t comment on each one of my posts. People are listening. You always have an audience. That’s something to remember.

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

I’m always evolving, and I plan to build out my magazine, CORSET, into a stronger digital force in addition to some other coaching and product offerings I have in the works related to sexuality.

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

They’re so many! But right now, Oprah, Danielle LaPorte, and Marie Forleo are rocking my world.

10) Share several ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

  • Be your authentic self. There’s no need to create an “online personality.” You are enough.
  • Speak your truth, and feel free to do it on as many social media outlets as you can handle.
  • Engage your subscribers, followers, etc. Your supporters want conversation, not just one way rhetoric. Be interactive and accessible.

 

 

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Jacqui Chew


Photo Credit: Jacqui Chew

 

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Jacqui Chew, Founder and Principal Consultant at iFusion Marketing, Co-Organizer at TEDxPeachtree, Atlanta Press Club Board of Director, speaker, and contributing writer.

Fun Facts: Jacqui and Digital Sisterhood Network founder Ananda Leeke met during Spelman College’s Digital Doyennes event held in April 2011 in Atlanta. They served as panelists and sat next to each other. A month later, Ananda interviewed Jacqui about her career on Digital Sisterhood Radio’s Feminism Online Series. Click here to listen to the interview. 

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

I started using RSS feeds and exploring UGC tools in 2006 as part of my work for a client and their customers who happen to be media companies.

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

Social media has allowed me to find my voice and a way to express my point of view. Growing up in Singapore where girls were taught to be seen and not heard, it has always been challenging in my adult life to have the self-confidence to express my point of view. Twitter and blogging have helped me do that.

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.”  Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings.  They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

The use of social media has helped me connect with my inner entrepreneur. It has helped me channel my passion for supporting technology entrepreneurship through my latest project, “The Art of The Launch,” which is the world’s first marketing hackathon. The hackathon seeks to connect creative professionals with founders to create viable product launch plans in one day.

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online.  In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: Fierce Living Online for 25 Years (Fall 2012), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others.  Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

I think you covered it all.

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

Influencer, mentor, promoter, and community builder

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

All the rules of human interaction in real life apply to the virtual world.

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

They are works in progress.

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

My favorites are Amber Nashlund — for her courage in coming out about clinical depression and Erika Napoletano for her wit.

 

 

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Nichelle Stephens


Photo Credit: Nichelle Stephens

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Nichelle Stephens, Community Evangelist for DigitalunDivided.com, a company that develops programs, projects, and forward thinking initiatives that bridge the digital divide including the FOCUS100 Symposium and Pitch BootCamp (will be held in October 2012). Nichelle is the co-founder of Cupcakes Take The Cake, the most popular blog about cupcakes (click here to watch a video of her talking about cupcakes), and the founder of new lifestyle blog, CoolBlkPpl (launched in May 2012). In addition, she serves as an editor, event producer, publicist, and social media strategist. CNN, The Today Show, Martha Stewart, and The Food Network have featured her.

FUN FACTS: Digital Sisterhood Network founder Ananda Leeke met Nichelle during the Blogging While Brown Conference held in Washington, D.C. During the conference, she introduced the blogging community to the NAACP Image Award winning Pepsi We Inspire, a branded lifestyle blog and community for African American women. She also spoke about the business of blogging. 

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

I was on Friendster and MySpace back in 2005. I joined Facebook and Twitter in 2006, but didn’t really start using it until 2007.

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

Social media helped me get freelance social media gigs, speaking opportunities at conferences and universities, new friends, and quick answers to questions.

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.”  Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings.  They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

I became the editor of Pepsi We Inspire via social media which led me to interact with a community of Black women. I am also the event organizer for my blog, Cupcakes Take The Cake, and I plan monthly offline events for the meetup group. I have set up Twitter chats to answer questions about baking.

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online.  In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: Fierce Living Online for 25 Years (Fall 2012), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others.  Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

Social media women leaders support each other, motivate others, brag and praise others’ successes, and share useful information.

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

I connect people, promote others, and share good links.

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

Someone is always listening.

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

I aim to do more paid public speaking.

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

Jamilah Lemeiux @jamilahlemeiux is a straight talker.  Tayari Jones @tayari is generous with information for writers.

10) Share three ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

  • Share good information and links.
  • Listen before jumping into conversation.
  • Be your best you.

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Amy Vernon


Photo Credit: Amy Vernon

 

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Amy Vernon, a freelance writer, digital strategist, and General Manager of Social Marketing for Internet Media Labs. She recently served as a guest expert during WomenGrowBusiness.com’s July Twitter chat.

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

I started in 2007, as the newspaper I was working for started launching many blogs. In all, I ended up writing for or administering four of the blogs (besides serving as Metro Editor) and was trying to figure out how to increase traffic to them. I used BlogCatalog, MyBlogLog and, perhaps most importantly, Digg.com, which eventually became a huge tool in our arsenal. When I was laid off from the newspaper in December 2008, my social media profiles brought consulting work my way immediately.

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

Personally, it’s enabled me to reconnect with friends from many stages of my life: high school, summer camp, college, various newspapers I’ve worked for. Many of the people I’ve reconnected with are extremely dear to me and it makes me so happy to have been able to reconnect. Professionally, it’s enabled me to support my family while working from home. It enabled me to hardly miss a beat after being laid off, immediately transitioning into this new career. I’ve developed a strong online profile and am respected for my opinions, which is very encouraging and humbling.

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.”  Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings.  They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

Social media has allowed me to develop into an authority on certain subjects, and has given me a leadership role in both the social media and journalism communities. Because of the work I’ve done in social, I’ve been asked to speak at conferences including ROFLCon, Affiliate Summit and Columbia University’s Social Media Weekend. I’ve spoken at SXSWi, Internet Week Headquarters and Social Media Week Hub events. This also has drawn me into leadership roles in organizations such as Girls In Tech, helping form the structure for the New York City chapter.

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online.  In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: Fierce Living Online for 25 Years (Fall 2012), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others.  Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

Wow. That’s an excellent list. I keep coming up with things to say, looking back at the list and realizing they’re already there!

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

Community builder, creator, curator, influencer, mentor, promoter, storyteller, and thought leader

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

We all need each other. The more you help others, the more you get out of it as well. I’ve been helped by many, and consider it my duty to continue to help others.  Also, don’t be stupid.

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

I hope. I would like to become more of a mentor to younger women, in particular.  My other goals include working more strategically in social, helping interesting people and organizations learn best practices. Teach them to fish, to to speak.

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

Emily Miethner — I know Emily considers me a mentor, but I consider her a mentor in many ways as well. I’ve learned so much from how Emily conducts herself and how her drive has led her to succeed so well at such a young age.  Shelly Kramer – She is unabashedly herself. She means what she says and says what she means and is incredibly smart.

Amanda Quraishi — She’s a social media honey badger.

10) Share three ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

  • Be true to yourself. You don’t have to agree with everything you share, but there still should be a reason you chose to share it, not just, “She asked me to.” Mindless shares and retweets just muddy the stream – and your personal brand.
  • Support others. Don’t use social to cut others down. Use it to build people and organizations up. If you have a problem with someone, approach them directly; social media should be a last resort to deal with a problem or issue. It should be a first resort when you’re supporting someone.
  • Share knowledge. We all have different skills and knowledge. Share it. Provide insight for others.

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Ebony Utley


Photo Credit: Ebony Utley

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Ebony Utley, Ph.D., is an associate professor of Communication Studies at California State University at Long Beach.  Ebony is an expert in popular culture, race, and romantic relationships. She is also a blogger, speaker, and author.  Check out her new book, Rap and Religion: Understanding The Gangsta’s God.

Rap and Religion by Ebony Utley

FUN FACTS: Digital Sisterhood Network founder Ananda Leeke loves reading Ebony’s blog posts on Ms. Magazine’s blog (especially the post about feminism and soap operas …. they both watch Young and the Restless). Ananda interviewed Ebony about feminism, social media, and her work as an author and professor during Digital Sisterhood Radio’s Feminism Online Project Series in 2011.

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

I started using social media seriously in 2008 as a way of amplifying my personal voice and a very raucous public space.

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

Personally, socially media allows me to easily update and stay updated on family and friends. Professionally, it helps me network and disseminate my ideas. In the community, I hope my use of social media helps inspire critical media literacy.

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.”  Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings.  They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

Social media helps me connect with women I would otherwise have never met. I love being networked with smart, savvy women around the globe whom I may never meet in any other way.

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online.  In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: Fierce Living Online for 25 Years (Fall 2012), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others.  Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

I think you covered all the bases in that list!

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

I am primarily a critic. I use social media to encourage people to think and rethink the mediated messages they receive.

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

Being a leader in a digital space is akin to losing your virginity. Once you put your goods out there, there’s no getting them back. It’s important to be wise and safe when entering a digital space that has an eternal memory. See my virgin blogger talk for more on this idea: http://youtu.be/SW-PGwYzoUI.

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

Indeed, I am starting my own blog as part of my new interactive website at www.rapandreligion.com. It will be the go to space for all news and updates involving the combination of rap and religion. The site will also have a cypher that specifically encourages online conversations about rap and religion (site went live on June 1).

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

Well, Ananda Leeke is one. She is relentless in her pursuit to understand how women use social media. I dig that. Dr. Marcia Dawkins (www.marciadawkins.com) is always on the cutting edge of social media. Whether she’s writing about online identity or hactivism, she always has her pulse on what’s next. Krystal Jackson (@artscurator) is a programmer and she’s dedicated to young black girls learning to code. I learn so much about new technologies for both of these women. They deserve their props.

10) Share three ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

  • Create an online identity that is distinct from your personal identity.
  • Use social media to make meaningful connections with strangers.
  • Be fearless in your pursuit of digital sisterhood; the unborn will need to walk in your digital footprint.

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Carol Cain


Photo Credit: Carol Cain @NYCityMama

 

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Carol Cain, founder and publisher of NYCityMama.com, photographer, freelance writer, travel blogger, and contributing writer for Lifetime Digital Media, Lifetime Momsat, and A&E Television Networks.

 

FUN FACTS: Digital Sisterhood Network founder Ananda Leeke met Carol during the BlogHer Conference in 2009.  A month after the conference, Ananda and interviewed Carol about her blog and travel adventures on Digital Sisterhood Radio in 2009.  In 2010, Ananda sat next to Carol during the Blogalicious Weekend Conference and learned a lot about photography (Carol served as the official photographer for the conference).  She also encouraged Carol to use Cinchcast to do a Spanish audio blog with her smartphone.  Ananda learned so much from Carol during her presentation on how she uses Twitter to build and engage her online community during the Blogalicious Weekend Conference in 2011.  Carol’s commitment to living healthy is an inspiration to Ananda!

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

December 2008

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

It has allowed me to fulfill my dream of travel with my family, and to connect with people and make new friends I would’ve never met otherwise.

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.”  Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings.  They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

It has helped me in setting myself up as a leader in my niche and community. I have had the opportunity to lead panels discussion, been given awards for my work, and am often reached out to by my community and readers for advice and information.

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online.  In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: Fierce Living Online for 25 Years (Fall 2012), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others.  Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

I agree with all of the above mentioned, especially storyteller and motivator. It’s what I most associated myself as being.

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

I hope my role is to inspire, inform, and guide.

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

I have learned to listen, that no matter what anyone says it’s not about me, and that we don’t exist in a void. Our success comes with the support of our community.

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

I do. I plan on continuing to grow my presence in the travel space and plan to be the face of travel for families.

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

Maria Bailey — for her strong will and dedication in advocating for professional digital women and moms

Jennifer James — for her commitment to doing good and charity

10) Share three ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

  • To grow their brand
  • To promote other women
  • T0 connect with their community

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Nadia Jones


Photo Credit: Nadia Jones – www.justicejonesie.com

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Nadia Jones, founder of The Niche Mommy Network and Conference.

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

I started using social media in 2006.

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

Personally, I have grown as a writer and as a woman.  I have been able to write about motherhood and personal issues that I have dealt with. Reflecting on my roles as a mother, wife, friend, has been a valuable experience. Professionally, I have started several businesses and new ventures and it’s been an exciting journey to follow my passion.

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.”  Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings.  They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

Starting The Niche Mommy Network & Conference and working with a large community of social media influencers has given me a chance to carve out a new leadership role for myself. Online and offline, I know that my actions reflect on the business and that I have to keep the interests of my community in mind.

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online.  In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: Fierce Living Online for 25 Years (Fall 2012), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others.  Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

I think you have summed them all up!  I would only add that motivator, promoter, social do gooder, and storyteller are some of my favorites.

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

Being the founder of the Niche Mommy Network & Conference and formerly Blogalicious Weekend has given me some wonderful opportunities.

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

I have learned that following your passion can be very rewarding.  I have also learned that online and offline personalities are not always the same, but to take it all in stride.

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

I hope to expand my leadership roles.  I would one day like to do this full-time.

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

Ana Flores, Jyl Johnson Pattee, and Danica Kombol

What I love about these social media leaders is their honesty, their willingness to help, and their passion about their causes.  Love them!

10) Share three ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

  • Women can use social media to pursue and follow their passion.
  • Women can use their social media influence to be a voice for social causes and social good.
  • Women can use social media to collaborate with other women similar to them, to build a community, and to find friendship and sisterhood among a whole set of friends.

Digital Sisterhood Leadership Project Profile – Veronica Arreola


Photo Credit: Veronica Arreola

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Veronica Arreola, founder of VivaLaFeminista.com.

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

I was using AOL Instant Messenger & Yahoo Messenger back in the late 1990s. I started on Facebook in 2005.

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

It has allowed me to amplify my voice in relation to the issues I work on, especially my professional work. I think that comes from being able to connect to others who are concerned about the lack of girls and women in science and engineering careers.

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.”  Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings.  They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

Social media has allowed me to connect to far more people than I could have in person. My passion for getting girls engaged in science and engineering is one of the things people remember about me. This is where conversations start, then I can connect to gender expectations, leadership, self esteem and on and on. Sometimes in a quick Twitter chat!

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online.  In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: Fierce Living Online for 25 Years (Fall 2012), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others.  Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

I think you got them!

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

Advocate, curator, educator, mentor, promoter, social do gooder, and thought leader

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

To honor my role as a leader and not abuse it. One quickly learns how swift your word can spread, so it better be golden!

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

Right now I’m focusing on completing my PhD. studies. I’m in maintenance mode for my digital leadership.

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

Mamita Mala. She is so honest with her views on everything including her own life. She doesn’t reveal everything, but when she discusses her life, it’s raw. She takes the same rawness to her discussion of politics and public policy.

10) Share three ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

  • Be yourself. Don’t try to fit a mold. Just because you have a brand doesn’t mean you have to act like a brand.
  • With power and influence comes responsibility. Be true to your readers. In other words, don’t sell them out.
  • Have fun! While it can be a job, you still need to have fun.