Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Lauren Fleming


Photo Credit: Lauren Fleming

 

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Lauren Fleming, founder of QueerieBradshaw.com and Creativity Squared, LLC, lawyer, speaker,  and writer.  Lauren recently spoke at the annual BlogHer conference. She spoke about the business of blogging during the Pathfinder Day’s Morning Fundamentals Workshop: My Blog as Business and as a panelist for The Personal: Erotica Out in the Open session.

Fun Fact: Digital Sisterhood Network founder Ananda Leeke attended Lauren’s BlogHer 12′ session on The Personal: Erotica Out in the Open and became an instant fan!

 

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

I started using social media back in the Friendster days, before you could just sign up, you had to have a friend already on there recommend you. I went through MySpace and Live Journal and everything since. I started using social media and keep using it for the same reason: I want to connect with my friends from all over the world.

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

Social media has enabled me to connect with the readers and writers of my site. It’s also helped me keep in touch with friends I otherwise wouldn’t still know.

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.” Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings. They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

Through social media, mostly Twitter, I’ve made a name for myself as an expert in sex, sexuality, gender, and gender identity. In that capacity, I’ve been able to mentor other writers, both younger and older than me, through the difficult and often stigmatized world of writing about such taboo topics.

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online. In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: Fierce Living Online for 25 Years (Fall 2012), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others. Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

I think you hit them all.

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

I often lead conversations that normally wouldn’t be had.

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

Keep doing it. It feels exhausting and like a time warp, but keep it up. People are listening.

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

I plan to turn my blog into a book and do a whole online book tour.

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

My favorite social media women leaders include everyone over at Women’s Media Center. They’re so very helpful. And BlogHer bloggers as well. They really inspire me to dig deeper and be my more authentic self.

10) Share several ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

  • Know who you are before you go into it.
  • Know who you are every time you post.
  • Know when to leave.
  • Don’t let online be your only life.

Meet Digital Sisiterhood Leader Erika Pryor


Photo Credit: Erika Pryor

 

Meet Digital Sisiterhood Leader Erika Pryor, a digital communications consultant and host of Digital 411, an Internet radio show featured on TalktainmentRadio.com.

 

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

I started using social media in 2008.

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

Social media has helped me connect with individuals throughout the world, find new business opportunities, build a personal and professional brand, experience new events, be identified as a thought leader is social media, and create an Internet radio program.

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.” Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings. They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

Social media has helped me carve out leadership roles through blogging and community development for various local and national websites.

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online. In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: Fierce Living Online for 25 Years (Fall 2012), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others. Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

The other types of leadership roles that women play in social media and digital marketing include bloggers and writers on various topics related to business and technology, influencers, and promoters.

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

Influencer, educator, motivator, promoter, and thought leader

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

Be honest and transparent. Identify what your goals are. Ask for help or assistance via social media.

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

Yes. I have plans to do more blog writing and publish an e-book and white papers.

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

Heather Whaling and Chalene Johnson — I like their business discussions and motivational advice.

10) Share several ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

  • Tweet.
  • Create a Facebook page.
  • Blog.

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Dwana De La Cerna – A #BlogHer12 Attendee


Photo Credit: Dwana De La Cerna

 

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Dwana De La Cerna, the founder of HouseonAHill.org, the managing editor of  TheChicagoMoms.com, and the assistant editor of Chicagonista.com.

Fun Facts: Dwana and Digital Sisterhood Network founder Ananda Leeke met during the BlogHer Conference in 2009. Click here to watch Dwana’s video interview with Ananda. They recently reconnected during BlogHer 12′ in New York City.

 

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

I started using social media in 2006.

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

Social media has allowed me to establish a blog, serve as the managing editor of ChicagoMoms.com, participate in panels such as the Marketing2Women, and serve an influencer for General Motors.

4) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online. In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: Fierce Living Online for 25 Years (Fall 2012), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others. Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

Women have powerful voices. They serve as contributors and support systems!

5) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

I commandeer the Twittersphere, promote good products, and help my social media pals!

6) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

Share often. Don’t hold back. Take risks.

7) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

Not sure, but am following my path.

8) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

There are so many. My list is so long. It includes Ananda Leeke, Tory Johnson, MJ Tam, Connie Burke, Ann Evanston, and Genma Holmes.

9) Share several ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

  • Participate.
  • Become involved in campaigns.
  • Take initiative.

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Vikki Reich – #BlogHer12 Voices of the Year Speaker


Photo Credit: Vikki Reich

 

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Vikki Reich, a writer and the founder of Up Popped A Fox blog.

Fun Facts: Vikki and Digital Sisterhood Network founder Ananda Leeke met during the BlogHer Conference in 2011. They participated in the Peer Networking panel and hung out at the Voices of the Year reception.  They recently reconnected at BlogHer 12′ in New York City. Also, Vikki was featured as one of the Voices of the Year. She read her Ministrations blog post about being herself.  

 

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

I began blogging in 2006. I joined Twitter in 2009 which is my favorite place to connect with people and promote my writing.

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

Social media has allowed me to connect to a diverse group of people and has empowered me to pursue my goals as a writer.

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.” Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings. They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

As a lesbian, I would traditionally have a smaller reach and network, but through the use of social media I have been able to connect with a wider audience which is the primary reason that I blog – to be visible and show that we are all engaged in similar struggles.

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online. In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: Fierce Living Online for 25 Years (Fall 2012), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others. Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

I don’t have anything to add – you’ve covered them all.

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

I see myself as a storyteller and use that to build community as well as educate people about issues that I face as a member of the GLBT community.

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

You get out of it what you put it into it.

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

Not currently.

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

  • Faiqa Khan – She is one of the smartest yet accessible people I know. She is not afraid of taking a stand but is also willing to have difficult conversations to promote understanding.
  • Deb Rox – She is incredibly supportive and encouraging to everyone around her.

10) Share several ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

Use all platforms to:

  • Establish your distinctive voice.
  • Establish yourself as someone who is willing to discuss issues with respect.
  • Believe in others and support them when you can. It always comes back to you.

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Issa Mas – #BlogHer12 Voices of the Year Speaker


Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Issa Mas, a single parent life coach, an advocate for single mothers, the founder of Your Single Parenting and Single Mama NYC, a published essayist, a NY Daily News featured blogger, and a writer of children’s books for her son. She is also a native New Yorker!

Fun Facts: Issa and Digital Sisterhood Network founder Ananda Leeke met during the Blogalicious Weekend Conference in 20101 They sat at the same table and became digital sisters. Click here to listen to Ananda’s 2011 podcast interview with Issa.  She recently attended the BlogHer 12′ Conference and was featured as one of the Voices of the Year. She read her blog post about mealtimes with her abuela (grandmother) and rocked the mic! Click here to read more about her BlogHer experience. 

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

I started using social media as a way to drive traffic to my websites and articles I’ve published elsewhere, but then it turned into an amazing way to connect with, and support, single parents everywhere.

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

Social media has helped editors find me via Twitter. They have contracted me to write for their publications. Social media has helped me establish genuine friendships with people I have spent time with in real life. I have contributed to the mental and emotional well-being of many more single mothers than I could have without social media.

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.” Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings. They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

I went from a single mom with a unique take on single parenthood (It is to be celebrated, not lamented!), to being considered an “expert” in positive single parenting.

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online. In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: Fierce Living Online for 25 Years (Fall 2012), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others. Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

I think there is no end to the extent to which women can affect change using social media.  Social media serves to amplify the skill sets already present, as well as giving women the opportunity to try out new roles.

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

My roles include Single Parenting Expert and Freelance Writer. These roles allow me to support and provide guidance to the single parenting community.  I also serve as an advocate of mental health awareness.

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

I’ve learned how to share insights in a way that speaks of “we”, not “you should”.

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

I am in the beginning stages of starting a nonprofit organization that will focus on the mental health of single parents.  Social media will undoubtedly be extremely helpful in extending the reach of that organization once it is up and running.

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

I don’t really have any. I tend to connect with “real” people who open themselves up and allow for a certain level of public vulnerability.

10) Share several ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

  • Use social media to authentically connect with people who share your circumstances, ideals, or challenges.
  • Bring value to others while promoting their brands.
  • Utilize social media to grow into new, as yet undiscovered roles of advocacy and leadership.

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Jodine Dorce


Photo Credit: Jodine Dorce

 

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Jodine Dorce, a social media/marketing professional and the founder of Jodine’s Corner.  Jodine is a Miami native who is currently living and working in New York City.  Jodine’s Corner is an online destination that promotes and features the arts, soul music, and entertainment. Jodine  launched the site and the bi-weekly newsletter when she moved to Altanta in 2000. It quickly bcame one of the premiere publications that helped build Atlanta’s entertainment scene.

Fun Facts: Jodine and Digital Sisterhood Network founder Ananda Leeke met while hanging out with friends at the Twin Jazz Club in Washington, D.C. in 2004.  After talking with Jodine, Ananda discovered they shared an interest in neosoul musicians like Eric Roberson and Julie Dexter.  Ananda started subscribing to Jodine’s newsletter, Jodine’s Corner which featured indie neosoul music and the arts scene in Atlanta. She later “friended” Jodine’s Corner on Myspace in 2006. Jodine’s Corner Myspace page and newsletter helped Ananda research indie music and artists in the United States and United Kingdom for her debut novel, Love’s Troubadours – Karma: Book One. Jodine and Ananda recently connected and chatted during the BlogHer 12′ Conference in New York City.

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

I started using social media when BlackPlanet.com was a hit in 1995. BlackPlanet.com was my first glimpse into the impact of the World Wide Web. I started building relationships with folks in Canada, South Africa, and Europe.

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

Social media has added so much value to my life. From a personal perspective, I’ve been able to:

  • Reunite with friends.
  • Reconnect and meet new family members.
  • Share information, resources, and activities with friends.

From a professional level, I’ve been able to expand my business. I have worked with clients through social media, gained new clients as well as share information. My business is driven on social media and it allows me to be a subject matter expert in that space.

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.” Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings. They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

When I worked with a marketing agency in Atlanta, I was responsible for producing event marketing activations. While working with the clients, I noticed that no one was discussing social media. I quickly started incorporating a social media plan for all of our activations. Once our clients started seeing the value through measurement and remarks, I became the leader in that space for all of our client pitches.

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online. In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: Fierce Living Online for 25 Years (Fall 2012), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others. Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

I think I would add, SALES. As saleswomen, we are actively selling when we start influencing, advocating, persuading, etc.

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

I would say that my role in social media deals more with culture, music, and marketing.

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

Be honest. Be authentically you. Be transparent. Engage. I can’t tell you how many times I read information on social media and the person behind the username or twitter handle is completely lying about who they are and what they are. It’s not a good feel when  you meet them in person. I would say the same for brands too. If you are the voice of a brand. Be that voice. You can’t have a quiet shy person being a brand voice for Red Bull energy drink. That quiet shy energy will flow through your messaging on social media and the folks that follow you will be turned off and disengaged.

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

Yes I plan to expand. I am still finding that next space but definitely working on expanding.

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

One of my favorite women in social media is Oprah Winfrey. Oprah gets it. As big as her brand is, she is still the person behind the username, reading all the tweets, responding, and commenting on Facebook. You feel that authenticity through your screen. She lights up social media platforms by directly responding to her fans. You are able to feel a connection to her. You feel engaged. That’s the kind of excitement you want to stir by really being you and engaging with your followers.

10) Share several ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

  •  Share information and resources. I can’t stress enough that by being active on social media and sharing, you immediately gain loyalty among your friends and followers. Then it becomes a two-way street because people want to automatically to share with you.
  • Network professionally and personally. Networking and being the conduit of connecting people on social media will help you expand your brand and indirectly allow you to promote your brand.
  • Communicate. When I tell people to communicate on social media I always get the confused look. There’s a lot of people on social media, but they aren’t saying anything. They are not communicating with you. They are screaming, passively whispering, not listening, and don’t really care who’s out there. Communication is a two-way street. Have something to say and listen. If you hear something, respond or share your thoughts. Communicate. So easy to say, so hard to do on social media sites.

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Patricia Patton


Photo Credit: Patricia Patton

 

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Patricia Patton, founder of BoomerWizdom.com, language educator, arts activist, writer, world traveler and guide, and global citizen.

Fun Facts: Patricia and Digital Sisterhood Network founder Ananda Leeke met during the BlogHer Conference held in San Diego, California, and later reconnected at the Blogalicious Weekend Conference held in Maryland in 2011. Since then, Ananda has followed Patricia’s social media adventures on Twitter. She will be speaking at the Blogging into MidLife: The Tension Between the Online Spotlight and Offline Invisibility session on August 4, 2012, at the BlogHer Conference in New York City. 

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

I started seriously using social media in 2008.

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

Social media has helped me get over all hang ups I held about failing. Change comes rapidly in social media. So I have become quite proficient at  leaning into what is new, risking  temporary failures as part of the process of learning and growing. Professionally, I am an expert in this regard

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.”  Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings.  They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline (share some examples too)?

Social media has freed me from a box that was   too tight. I have always had multiple interests but was always encouraged to find just one thing. That advice never spoke to me. Online I cross imaginary boundaries. I have improved my interactions skills. I am free to write with the authority of having lived my own life on every topic from social good for example, based on having worked with an early social investment fund in the mid 90’s to vegan cooking.  I can share my knowledge/interests in everything from languages to gardening to travel to hip hop and contemporary culture.  I don’t have to make sense to a small immediate neighbors because the world is my neighborhood.

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online.  In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: Fierce Living Online for 25 Years (Fall 2012), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others.  Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

Inter-generational link builders

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

Advocate, curator, social do gooder, storyteller, and mentor

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

I am the best example of a woman like me living in these times that I know. How I see the world is important to share with the world and to leave for the world to.

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

I want to create events, activities, and a global network to encourage the digital participation of baby boomer bloggers from communities of color.  I want to support those who oppose marginalization in the digital space.

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

Elisa Camahort Page is open, smart,generous and humble. Pam Perry, dynamic and a strong collaborator. Ananda Leeke is a quiet worker, always with a smile, true example of walking her talk. Alexis Pauline Gumbs is smart and young, and makes me think about life in a different way.

10) Share several ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

  • Participate in conversations that historically are closed to people like me.
  • Interview and talk to people whose stories are not told in the mainstream media.

 

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Monica Barnett


Photo Credit: Monica Barnett

 

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Monica Barnett, an image curator and the founder of Blueprint for Style LLC. Monica is a seasoned vet in the fashion industry who has worked with a diverse clientele including executives, professionals, and organizations across the United States and overseas. She is also a speaker and writer. Her image, fashion, and style commentary have been featured in the Washington Post, MyBlogalicious, MyStyle (part of the Style Network), and Lucky and Uptown Magazines.

Fun Facts: Monica’s image and style tips have inspired the “BoHo budget fashionista” living inside of Digital Sisterhood Network founder Ananda Leeke. Ananda loves reading her Blueprint for Style tweets, Facebook updates, and blog posts! They first met at the Blogalicious DC Meet Up and later reconnected at the Fabulous Women Business Owners DC meetings in 2010. Since then, Monica has appeared as a guest on Digital Sisterhood Radio and shared her styling advice with women bloggers and social media influencers at the Fierce Living in Fashion Tweetup held at the Violet Boutique in Washington, D.C. during Digital Sisterhood Month in December 2011. In February 2012, she served as a community leader for the BlissDom Conference and hung out with Ananda, Stacey Ferguson a/k/a Justice Fergie, Johnica Reed, and Demetria Lucas at the Heart of Haiti blogger reception sponsored by Everywhere. Monica will be speaking at the How to Price and Value Your Services session on August 4, 2012, at the BlogHer Conference in New York City.

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

I started using social media in earnest about four years ago and then ramped it up when I became an entrepreneur.

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

Social media has provided access to a population of people I wouldn’t normally see, business contacts, and social connections.

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.”  Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings.  They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

It allows me to share more with more people, and as a result, I think people see me as an inspiration.

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online.  In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: Fierce Living Online for 25 Years (Fall 2012), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others.  Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

Of the 12 leadership roles, I’d say I most closely align with curator of content, an inspiration, and a motivator.

6) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

Chose your words carefully because you don’t know who’s listening/watching, and you can’t take it back once it’s out there!

7) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

As an entrepreneur, I have invested heavily in working with more corporations and thus am looking to expand my circle of influence there. Additionally, I want to expand my leadership role in marrying fashion and technology, and in sharing inspiration around cancer.

8) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

Ananda Leeke and Stacey Ferguson

Whenever they share something, it’s worth listening to.

9) Share several ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

  • Share what you’re passionate about.
  • Give a little of yourself and your expertise to others.
  • Support others in their attempts to expand (choose your efforts wisely).

 

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Arielle Loren


Photo Credit: Arielle Loren

 

Photo Credit: Arielle Loren

 

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Arielle Loren, writer, activist, and founder of Corset Magazine.

Fun Facts: Arielle has been a guest on Digital Sisterhood Radio. In her 2011 interview with Digital Sisterhood Network founder Ananda Leeke, she shared her thoughts about her digital experiences, writing career, travel plans, and feminism online. Click here to listen to the show.  Ananda loves reading Arielle’s articles on Clutch Magazine. Arielle will be speaking about how she created her distinctive erotic territory online during The Personal: Erotica Out in the Open session on August 4, 2012, at the BlogHer Conference in New York City.  

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

I started using social media merely to connect with people who I knew in real life. My relationship with social media morphed into a way to connect with people who I both knew in real life and people who I didn’t know, but all of whom have similar interests to my work as a sexuality writer and owner of Corset Magazine, the go-to magazine for all things sexuality.

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

Social media has allowed me to connect with like-minded people championing women’s and sexual empowerment. It’s allowed me to build an awesome community of sex-curious readers for Corset Magazine, and gain a family-like following for my freelance writing.

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.”  Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings.  They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

I am truly thankful that social media has allowed me to build an amazing, close-knit following of friends that support my work and entrepreneurial endeavors. I’m often the go-to woman for sexuality advice and writing in my network circles, which has led to numerous opportunities to connect with my social media friends offline as well.

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online.  In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: Fierce Living Online for 25 Years (Fall 2012), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others.  Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

Women are truly social media healers, as many of us use our feminine energy and nurturing skills to reaffirm other women and men in need of empowerment. Healers are leaders, and the connections that we form online are not merely coincidental. I believe they’ve transformed into a channel for inspiring greater good.

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

I definitely consider myself a community builder, content curator, healer, influencer, and motivator on my social media networks. All of these roles are part of my personality, and I bring my authentic self to all of my social media outlets.

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

I’ve learned that people are listening and reading what you post even when you think they’re not. I’m always surprised when I meet people, both strangers and “real-life” friends who follow my social media musings, even if they don’t comment on each one of my posts. People are listening. You always have an audience. That’s something to remember.

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

I’m always evolving, and I plan to build out my magazine, CORSET, into a stronger digital force in addition to some other coaching and product offerings I have in the works related to sexuality.

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

They’re so many! But right now, Oprah, Danielle LaPorte, and Marie Forleo are rocking my world.

10) Share several ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

  • Be your authentic self. There’s no need to create an “online personality.” You are enough.
  • Speak your truth, and feel free to do it on as many social media outlets as you can handle.
  • Engage your subscribers, followers, etc. Your supporters want conversation, not just one way rhetoric. Be interactive and accessible.

 

 

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Carolina Pichardo


Photo Credit: Carolina Pichardo

Photo Credit: Young Urban Moms

Meet Digital Sisterhood Leader Carolina Pichardo, co-founder of YoungUrbanMoms.com, digital  marketer by day, writer and community activist by night, and mom to Lulu  always. Carolina recently attended the Top Bloguera Retreat sponsored by Latinos in Social Media (LATISM) in Washington, D.C. During the LATISM Retreat, she and her fellow Latina bloggers visited the White House  and met with Cecilia Munoz, Assistant to President Obama and Director of Domestic Policy. Click here to read her blog post about the Retreat and White House visit.

Fun Facts: Carolina and Digital Sisterhood Network founder Ananda Leeke first connected during the BlogHer Closing Keynote session in 2010. They sat at the same table, exchanged business cards, and talked about what they learned from BlogHer conference sessions. Since then, Ananda has followed Carolina’s online adventures on Twitter and become a huge fan of Young Urban Moms.

1) How can people find you online?

2) Why did you start using social media?

I started using social media in the late 90s with MySpace and a few other sites for friends.

3) What has social media allowed you to do in your life (personal, professional, business, nonprofit, community)?

Social media has allowed YoungUrbanMoms.com to expand nationally and partner with young moms and organizations we wouldn’t have otherwise have known. Through it, we’ve been able to create and continue building upon the network and platform we’ve always dreamed of establishing.

4) In her 2011 Digital Women: from geeks to mainstream presentation that was given at the WIFT International Women Conference for Digital Women, Dr. Taly Weiss, a social psychologist and CEO/Founder of Trendspotting, concluded that “women are dominant digital users – they breathe and live digital.”  Dr. Weiss’ conclusion echoes BlogHer’s 2011 Social Media Matters Study findings.  They include 87 million women (18 to 76 years old) are now online, 69 million women use social media weekly, 80 million women use social media monthly, and 55 million women read blogs monthly. These facts illustrate the power and presence women have in the digital space. Now that’s Digital Sisterhood!

How has social media helped you carve out leadership roles as you interact online and offline?

YoungUrbanMoms.com has been able to expand, and with it my ability to personally work with local young moms. In New York City, I’ve been able to create career and networking workshops for young moms and families, and run a column with the widely recognized publications, Manhattan Times and Bronx Free Press.

5) Social media has helped women become Digital Sisterhood Leaders, ambassadors of social expression who share what they are passionate about online.  In her upcoming book, Digital Sisterhood: Fierce Living Online for 25 Years (Fall 2012), Ananda Leeke, founder of the Digital Sisterhood Network, writes, “Without even knowing it, women have become Digital Sisterhood Leaders as they use their social media platforms to advocate causes; to build communities; to create apps, art, books, businesses, products, publications, services, tools, and webisodes; to curate content; to educate and inform; to give voice to their thoughts as subject matter experts, thought leaders, and brand ambassadors; to share information and experiences; to explore and experiment with new technologies as early adopters and trendsetters; to engage in social good; to influence others with their lifestyles and personal interests; to inspire and motivate; to mentor; to network; to tell their personal stories; and to promote and celebrate the expertise, gifts, and talents of others.  Based on my online and offline interactions, I have identified 12 key leadership roles they play: advocate, community builder, creator, curator, educator, influencer, mentor, motivator, promoter, social do gooder, storyteller, and thought leader.”

What other types of leadership roles do women play in social media?

I would add – although similar to some of the rest, but a bit more powerful in connotations – agent of change. We’ve become the face of a lot of the causes we represent. For example, although I’m not young and very far from the place I was when YoungUrbanMoms.com was launched, I will forever be that agent of change for young mothers and how this group is represented.

6) What types of leadership roles do you play in social media?

I always aim to influence and assist those starting out, especially the young moms that contribute to the site, but always feel like I’m learning myself. I’m more of a player and curator still at this point.

7) What lessons have you learned as a leader in the digital space?

There’s always more to learn. Always remain open to those new possibilities and opportunities. Also, go into social media with a set of values and stand firm by them.

8) Do you have plans to expand your leadership roles in the digital space? If so, what are they?

Yes, as of now I’ve been focusing on the site – YoungUrbanMoms.com, but feel like I need also begin branding myself alongside the brand. This way, I’ll be able to grow and expand as a person and leader, and the brand won’t be affected by these decisions.

9) Who are your favorite social media women leaders and why?

Angelica Perez of New Latina is an excellent example to follow. She’s a strong, firm, and intelligent voice and representation of Latina women in the digital space.

10) Share several ways women can use social media to define and express their personal leadership brand.

  • Connect with organizations and brands that have an established history in your cause.
  • Strategize how you post. For example, connecting Facebook to Twitter and vice versa. However, don’t always stick to certain social media rules. How honest and fun you’re having with your brand shows, and people will trust that.
  • May sound crazy, but don’t just use social media. Find ways to connect with others through conferences, Skype, and something that shows more than your avatar.